Halloween Eyeball Cake Pops

Halloween Eyeball Cake Pops

These Halloween cake pops only have eyes for you! Your child can create his very own Halloween eyeball cake pops to gross out friends and family. They’ll be disgusted at first, but then they’ll discover how tasty these Halloween cake pops are! Kids will love dipping these Halloween eyeball cake pops in white chocolate and decorating them to look like a plucked-out eye. Eat Halloween cake pops this All Hallows’ Eve for a deliciously spooky treat.

What You Need:

  • Chocolate cake mix
  • 8 oz. softened cream cheese
  • 1 tablespoons milk
  • 2 cups confectioner’s sugar
  • 4 tablespoons softened butter
  • Plastic wrap
  • White chocolate chips
  • Blue, red and black gel icing
  • Straws
  • Baking tray
  • Wax paper
  • Double boiler

What You Do:

  1. Follow the baking directions to make your cake. Allow it to cool or refrigerate overnight.
  2. In a bowl, crumble the cake using a fork or your fingers.
  3. Whip together cream cheese, butter, sugar and milk and pour it into the cake crumbs.
  4. Mix well. If the cake is still too crumbly to form into balls, add one tablespoon of milk until it’s a soft clay-like consistency. Cover with plastic and refrigerate overnight.
  5. Cover a baking tray with wax paper and roll the cold cake mixture into balls the size of golf balls and set them onto the paper.
  6. In a double boiler, melt the white chocolate chips. (If you don’t have a double boiler, use two pots on top of one another; the bottom pot should have two cups of water in it. Set it on medium heat.)
  7. As soon as the white chocolate looks shiny, remove it from the heat and mix immediately.
  8. Dip the cake balls in the white chocolate and coat them by using a toothpick to move them around. Set them on the wax paper to dry.
  9. Place the tray of dipped eyeballs in the fridge for an hour to set them.
  10. Squeeze a small circle of blue gel on the top of the chilled cake pop. Fill in the center of the circle with a dot of black gel. Use the red gel to create squiggly red veins.
  11. Carefully, poke a straw into the bottom of the eyeball and place it in a clear glass to serve.
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Monster Dance

Monster Dance

Are you ready for a graveyard smash? Catch the dance mash fever with this catchy and foot-tapping activity that’s all about movement and Halloween fun!

What You Need:

  • Music
  • Construction paper
  • Pencil
  • Scissors
  • Yarn
  • Black marker
  • Hole punch

What You Do:

  1. Help your child draw circles on the construction paper that are at least nine inches wide.
  2. Encourage her to cut out each circle.
  3. Have her use the hole punch to make a hole in the top of each circle.
  4. Help her cut pieces of yarn that are each at least a foot and a half long.
  5. Thread one piece of yarn through each paper circle.
  6. Help her tie each yarn piece in a small knot.
  7. Brainstorm dance awards with your child. Consider awards for Best Stomp, Fastest Dancer, Spookiest Moves, Silly Tapper and Best Monster Impersonator!
  8. Help her use a marker to write out one award on each paper circle.
  9. Set the awards aside.
  10. Gather up your monster dancers. Remember, this isn’t just a game for kids—no one’s too old for a monster mash!
  11. Turn on the music.
  12. Encourage everyone to show off their best dance moves. The sillier, the better.
  13. While everyone is dancing, have your child start passing out the awards. Make sure everyone gets one!
  14. After the music ends, let your child officially announce the winner of each award.
  15. Play the music again! See if your child’s friends and family members can win different awards this round.
“The Monster Mash” was written and performed by Bobby “Boris” Pickett in 1962.

I was working in the lab late one night.
When my eyes beheld an eerie sight.
For my monster from his slab began to rise.
And suddenly to my surprise,
 He did the Mash!
He did the monster Mash!
The monster Mash!
It was a graveyard smash!
He did the Mash!
It caught on in a flash!
He did the Mash!
He did the monster Mash!
From my laboratory in the castle east,
To the master bedroom where the vampires feast,
The ghouls all came from their humble abodes
To get a jolt from my electrodes.
They did the Mash!
They did the monster Mash!
The monster Mash!
It was a graveyard smash!
They did the Mash!
It caught on in a flash!
They did the Mash!
They did the monster Mash!
The zombies were having fun.
The party had just begun.
The guests included Wolf Man,
Dracula and his son.
The scene was rockin’. All were digging the sounds.
Igor on chains, backed by his baying hounds.
They played the Mash!
They played the monster Mash!
The monster Mash!
It was a graveyard smash!
They played the Mash!
It caught on in a flash!
They played the Mash!
They played the monster Mash!
Out from his coffin, Drac’s voice did ring.
Seems he was troubled by just one thing.
He opened the lid and shook his fist.
And said, “Whatever happened to my Transylvania twist?”

It’s now the Mash!
It’s now the monster Mash!
The monster Mash!
And it’s a graveyard smash!
It’s now the Mash!
It’s caught on in a flash!
It’s now the Mash!
It’s now the monster Mash!

Now every thing’s cool, Drac’s a part of the band.
And my Monster Mash is the hit of the land.
For you, the living, this Mash was meant too.
When you get to my door, tell them Boris sent you.

 


Then you can Mash!
Then you can monster Mash!
The monster Mash!
And do my graveyard smash!
Then you can Mash!
You’ll catch on in a flash!
Then you can Mash!
Then you can monster Mash!

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Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

Roasted Pumpkin Seeds

After your kids finish carving the pumpkins, turn the scooped-out seeds into a healthy snack. This is a great opportunity to explain to your kids where seeds come from.

Roasted pumpkin seeds are a yummy annual snack, and they’re high in zinc and other minerals, amino acids, and Vitamin K.

What You Need:

  • Pumpkin seeds
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • Strainer
  • Baking sheet
  • Aluminum foil

What You Do:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Spread aluminum foil over a baking sheet.
  2. Dig your seeds from your pumpkin and put them in the strainer. Carefully rinse them under cold running water, and separate the strings of pumpkin flesh from the seeds. The stringy pieces can go in the compost or the trash.
  3. Spread the seeds across the baking sheet, and spoon olive oil over them. Then sprinkle salt and cumin over them too. Mix them up to make sure the oil, salt and cumin are well mixed.
  4. Put the baking sheet in the oven for 15-20 minutes. Take them out when they are golden brown and crunchy. Let them cool a while before eating them.
  5. Enjoy the pumpkin seeds alone as a snack, or add them to trail mix or salads.

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Orange Punch Recipe

Orange Punch Recipe

If your child likes Creamsicles, he’ll love this punch. It comes together with just a few ingredients, but makes enough for a thirsty crowd. Since this recipe doesn’t require any cooking, even young kids can join in the fun of making a batch. With its bright orange hue, this frosty beverage is perfect for a Halloween party, or summer barbecue. For a fruitier and slushier version, substitute a pint of rainbow sherbet for the vanilla ice cream. Bottoms up!

What You Need:

  • 1.5 quarts orange cream sherbet
  • 1 pint vanilla ice cream
  • 1 6-ounce can orange juice concentrate, thawed
  • 1 liter lemon lime soda (ginger ale is fine, too)

What You Do:

  1. Take the sherbet out of the freezer and let it soften, about 30 minutes.
  2. In a large punch bowl, combine all four ingredients, adding the soda last. Watch it fizzle and foam!
  3. Stir well, then pour into a large punch bowl with a ladle for serving.

For a spooky effect, consider using dry ice.

Did You Know?

In the Middle East, the word sherbet, also written sharbat, means “sweet”. Sherbet is often served at the signing of a marriage contract.

**This recipe is peanut free, tree nut free, and vegetarian.

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Lollipop Ghosts

Lollipop Ghosts

Halloween doesn’t have to be all thrills and chills. Help your child make a yummy and inexpensive treat for her friends and family members. Watch out though! Some of these ghosts have a silly secret under their ghostly cloaks.

What You Need:

  • Lollipops
  • White tissues
  • Black marker
  • Orange yarn
  • Tinfoil

What You Do:

  1. Have your child layer two white tissues on top of each other.
  2. Help her shift the top tissue so that the corners are not exactly lined up with the tissue below it.
  3. Let her place the top of the lollipop in the center of the tissues.
  4. Help her gather the edges of the tissue upward, fully surrounding the lollipop.
  5. Have your child hold the tissues securely at the base of the lollipop.
  6. Use orange yarn to tie a small bow around the base of the lollipop.
  7. Help your child use a black marker to draw a face on the tissue paper. She can make a scary ghost with an open mouth (imagine the ghost shouting “Boo!”) or a friendly ghost with a simple smile.
  8. How many of your child’s friends and family members would appreciate a tasty snack? Help her make enough lollipop ghosts for all the special people in her life. Encourage her to try and make different faces for each ghost.
  9. While your child is busy drawing faces, add a bit of spooky fun by creating some “ghostly” lollipops.
  10. Mold a small square of tin foil over one of the lollipops.
  11. Remove the lollipop carefully, allowing the tin foil to retain the spherical shape.
  12. Cover the tin foil with tissue — just like you would do with the normal lollipop — and secure with orange yarn.
  13. Gently draw a face on the tissue.
  14. Combine your child’s lollipop ghosts with your fake lollipops. Trick or treat! Will people get a real lollipop or just the ghostly remains of one?
  15. Make sure you and your child make enough actual lollipop ghosts so that everyone can enjoy — even if they picked a tin foil one on the first try.

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Ghoul Guts Squash Soup

Ghoul Guts Squash Soup

Stringy orange ghoul guts are actually a healthy and gross-looking appetizer for your child’s Halloween party. The recipe calls for a cooked spaghetti squash, tomato sauce and raisins to create the perfect texture of horror. When mixed together and served in clear glasses they can be gobbled down in one delicious slurp!

What You Need:

  • Spaghetti squash
  • Tomato sauce or spaghetti sauce
  • Raisins
  • Oven

What You Do:

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. While the oven is warming up, cut the squash in half and puncture a bunch of holes in its skin. Then lay it flat on a lightly greased baking sheet.
  3. Once the oven has reached an optimal temperature, cook the squash for 30–45 minutes, or until you can easily puncture its skin with a knife. This is a great time to show your child how to set a timer.
  4. Allow the squash to cool.
  5. Warm up the tomato or spaghetti sauce in a pan.
  6. Scoop out the seeds from the center of the spaghetti squash and discard, or roast the seeds in a similar way you would  pumpkin seed  for another treat! Fork out the “spaghetti” strands into a bowl.
  7. Mix several tablespoons of the sauce into the squash. The squash texture should be stringy and not too saucy.
  8. Sprinkle in a handful of raisins and mix together.

Scoop out the “ghoul guts” into a glass and serve! Devilishly frightening!

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How to Make a Trick-or-Treat Bag

How to Make a Trick-or-Treat Bag

Learn how to make a trick-or-treat bag for Halloween! Don’t waste your money on yet another disposable Halloween treat bag this year. Try this fun activity instead and encourage your child to recycle, reduce, and reuse. Make this spooky mini-masterpiece with your trick-or-treater this October.

This activity combines an environmental awareness lesson with the exploration of artistic printing and painting processes, along with color and shape recognition. Your child is sure to be proud of his very own, special Halloween candy receptacle. The best part is, he’ll get to show it off as he trick-or-treats!

What You Need:

  • Extra large white paper bag (shopping bags, grocery bags, anything you have lying around that you might want to get rid of)
  • Tempera paints (because this activity will result in a bag that food is to be placed in, take extra caution in finding a paint labeled non-toxic and safe for children)
  • Cardboard tubes (e.g. paper towel rolls)
  • Paintbrush
  • Ribbon
  • Stapler
  • Glue

What You Do:

  1. Provide your child with a variety of Halloween inspired colors. Think of black cats and bats, orange and green pumpkins, purple witch’s hair, and white ghosts.
  2. Encourage your child to explore and experiment with the paints and a cardboard tube. Ask him questions such as, “What shape is a pumpkin?” Have him dip the end of the tube into the paint, and then press it onto the paper bag. This can be a pumpkin, the body of a creepy cat, or part of a scary spider.
  3. If your kid is a little older and ready for a more complex illustration, have him make a haunted house. Giant triangles work wonderfully for the house itself, and smaller triangles or squares are perfect for windows. Have your child to use the paint brush to fill in parts of the shapes, and to add extra details and background elements.
  4. He can also decorate his bag with words. Encourage him to write “Happy Halloween” or “Trick or Treat,” like we did. He might even want to write his name.
  5. For added fun, encourage your child to use his fingers to create tiny ghosts or bat wings on the bag.
  6. Set your child’s finished creation aside and let it dry thoroughly.
  7. Now for the handles! Cut four pieces of ribbon that will work as suitable bag handles.
  8. Position two pieces of the ribbon so that they cover one of the bag handles. Staple the pieces of ribbon together so the bag handle is fully covered.
  9. Repeat steps 7 and 8 to create the other sturdy handle. Now, when the bag gets heavy with all the candy your trick-or-treater has collected, the strengthened bag handles won’t break.

Due to the nature of the materials used for this activity, use caution and a little bit of common sense. If the paint has soaked through or is not dry, you can line with bag with another paper bag without anything on it. Additionally, if Halloween night is wet and rainy do not use this bag as it’s not water resistant. Instead, keep it indoors as a fun Halloween inspired decoration to hold your candy stash!

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Candy Corn Art

Candy Corn Art

Take a tasty treat and make a lasting work of art! Whether you love the sweet candy kernels or not, the vibrant colors of candy corn make them perfect for your child and his artistic talents. Just be sure to warn any trick-or-treaters who may happen upon this delightful project — glue and candy corn are not a yummy mixture.

What You Need:

  • Bag of candy corn
  • Glue
  • Pencil
  • Construction paper

What You Do:

  1. Have your child use a pencil to draw a Halloween design on the construction paper. Help him out with ideas if he’s a bit stumped. His candy corn art can be of a scary monster like a vampire or a zombie — or he can make a beautiful pumpkin or a friendly ghost.
  2. Let him dump out his bag of candy corn on the construction paper. Don’t use all the candy though! You want to save some to eat, of course.
  3. Have him start experimenting with plaing the candy corn on his Halloween design. The candy corns can be lined up side by side for a thicker line, tip to tip for an interesting pattern, or tip to bottom to create long lines. Single candy corns also work well to make creepy eyes and pointy teeth.
  4. Help your child carefully glue the candy corns in place.
  5. Set the construction paper and candy corns aside to dry.
  6. On Halloween night, hang up your child’s creative masterpiece for all the trick-or-treaters to enjoy!

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Make an Accordion Skeleton

Make an Accordion Skeleton

Decorating for Halloween is always fun, but it can quickly put a strain on the budget. Solve that problem by making some of your decorations at home. This crinkled paper skeleton is big on charm and is sure to be a hit with the kids. Sneak in a lesson on the skeletal system while you put Mr. Bones together by asking your child to name the different parts of the skeleton and locate them on his own body.

What You Need:

  • 20″ x 24″ white paper
  • Pencil
  • Thick black marker
  • Glue

What You Do:

  1. First, cut the arm and leg pieces. Measure and mark four ¾” stripes across the short side of the paper and have your child cut them out.
  2. Next, have him accordion fold the strips, starting at one end and folding back and forth all the way to the other end.
  3. Sketch out the skull, ribs and pelvis shapes on half of the remaining sheet of paper (it’s easiest to fold the paper in half to get symmetrical shapes).
  4. Help him cut out the shapes while you sketch out the hands and feet, then have him cut those out too.
  5. Using the black marker, draw outlines on the skull, ribs, and pelvis for your child to color in. Outline the eyes and nose on the skull, the ribs of the ribcage, and the holes in the pelvis.
  6. Have your child carefully color in all of the outlines and draw the skeleton’s teeth.
  7. Cut one longer piece of spine and one shorter piece from the remaining white paper.
  8. Lay out the pieces before assembling them and make sure hands and feet are placed properly before gluing.
  9. Finally, help him glue all the parts of the skeleton together.

Your finished skeleton will make a perfect spooky decoration for a door or window. On a windy night, he’ll dance spookily in the wind!

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Halloween Ghost Craft

Halloween Ghost Craft

Now that October’s here, with days getting chillier and afternoons more cozy, it’s a great time for family crafts. Here’s a Halloween decoration you and your child can make together. While this one doesn’t require much pencil and paper time, never fear—it still boosts those skills.

In first grade, we try to use lots of “tactile” activities like this one, which build hand-eye coordination and small motor skills that kids need for handwriting and keyboarding. So, follow the directions below and cut and paste away!

What You Need:

  • A plastic table cover to protect your table surface
  • 2 large sheets of white tissue paper
  • A roll of fat, fuzzy black nylon yarn (often available at a gift wrap store)
  • 1 set of large “wiggly” eyes (find them at a craft or sewing store)
  • Plain white glue (like Elmer’s)
  • 1 spray bottle of liquid starch (found alongside laundry detergent at the store)

What You Do:

  1. Start by covering your table with plastic, or work on a flat surface which can get sticky with glue before you wash it off! Then, take one sheet of tissue paper and spread it on a flat surface. It’s usually pretty big—perhaps 20″ x 24”—so leave some space.
  2. Now have your child pull out a long piece of black fuzzy yarn, and use it to make a big, blobby outline shape of a ghost. Arrange the yarn like a big outline and clip it where the ends meet. When your kid has arranged just the right shape, squeeze out a line of glue just under the yarn and stick the yarn to the tissue. If your child wants the ghost to have a mouth, he should take a little extra yarn, lay it down and glue that down, too. Remember, there’s lots of room for creativity here! Your ghost may or may not have arms; the smile may be crooked or straight … or it may be a big round “O.”
  3. Once you’ve got your outline and mouth all set, take the glue and make another line of it on top of the fuzzy yarn. Now you’re ready to lay the remaining tissue piece on top to make a “sandwich.”
  4. For ideal results, let the glue dry and harden—at least an hour. Then take out your liquid spray starch, and spray the whole ghost thoroughly. Hang it from a clothesline to dry.
  5. When your “ghost” is dry and crisp, clip the edges around the fuzzy yarn and glue on the wiggly eyes. Hang your “ghost” in a window and say “Boo”!

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