Chocolate Dipped Spoons

Chocolate Dipped Spoons

Make chocolate dipped spoons with your child this holiday season! Whether you’re looking for a great gift your child can make or a special holiday recipe for the whole family, these chocolate dipped spoons are a perfect solution. Dipped in chocolate and decorative sprinkles, these chocolate dipped spoons are delicious swirled in warm milk to make cocoa or in an adult’s coffee. These chocolate dipped spoons look beautiful wrapped in cellophane and tied with colorful ribbons, and they are easy to make in large batches. The only hard part is waiting until the chocolate dipped spoons cool to start licking them! This is perfect especially for cocoa!

You can find plastic spoons that are very decorative, metallic and colorful too.

What You Need:

  • An assortment of plastic or inexpensive metal spoons
  • 2 small microwave-safe bowls
  • Chocolate chips
  • White chocolate, broken into small bits
  • Your choice of toppings: crushed peppermint candies, red and green sugar or sprinkles, blue and white sugar or sprinkles
  • A rimmed baking sheet, lined with parchment or waxed paper
  • Optional: cellophane, scissors, and ribbon

What You Do:

  1. Line the baking sheet with paper and set aside.
  2. Place toppings in small bowls and set aside.
  3. Place chocolate chips in one bowl and microwave, stirring every 15 seconds, until thoroughly melted.
  4. Show your child how to dip the spoons in chocolate until the bowl of the spoon is well-coated. Do not dip the entire spoon. Set each spoon aside on the baking sheet to cool and dry. You can chill in refrigerator to speed cooling process if desired.
  5. Repeat process with white chocolate, dipping cooled spoons in white chocolate. Leave some of the dark chocolate showing above the white chocolate.
  6. Sprinkle the white chocolate portion of the spoons with the toppings of your choice before setting aside to cool.
  7. When thoroughly cooled, wrap in sheets of cellophane and ribbons to give as gifts or use to stir warm milk or coffee.

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Tip Toes

Tip Toes

What do the number “5” and a footprint have in common? Christmas! Your child will create an adorable Christmas tree from his footprint and practice counting repeatedly up to the number “5” while decorating his tree with objects of different textures. The resulting work of art is festive, fun and a great way to master counting up to 5.

What You Need:

  • White paper
  • Green tempera paint
  • Large paintbrush
  • Construction paper
  • Markers
  • Glue stick
  • Metallic paper
  • Mini poms (5 of the same color)
  • Buttons (5 of the same color)
  • Sequins (5 of the same color)
  • Beads (5 of the same color)
  • Scissors
  • Pencil

What You Do:

  1. Ask your child to point to each toe on one of his feet and count his toes out loud from one to five.
  2. Help him to paint the bottom of his foot and press it in the center of the paper to leave a footprint. Turn the paper so the toes are pointing down.
  3. Have him cut out five small squares from construction paper to create gifts to go under his tree. Count each square aloud with him until he has five of them cut out and glue them under the toes. For the final embellishment to the presents, encourage him to draw five bows, one on each of the gift boxes using the markers.
  4. Encourage him to pick one type of textured object he’s gathered and place the pieces wherever he likes to create a beautiful Christmas scene. Count out loud with him as he glues them in place. Repeat this with each textured object until all of them are glued in place.
  5. Ask him to draw and cut out a five-pointed star from the metallic paper.
  6. Glue the star on the top of the tree.

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Christmas Tree Counting

Christmas Tree Counting

As you begin conjuring up your home’s holiday decorations, remember that you have your very own live-in artist! Here’s a hands-on math activity that will also result in a charming Christmas decoration! These Christmas tree mats and the accompanying Play-Doh math game are a great activity to improve your child’s basic counting skills, while embellishing your home for the holidays.

What You Need:

  • Green and yellow construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
  • Marker
  • Glue stick
  • Play dough
  • String (or thin wire)

What You Do:

  1. Ask your child to draw a Christmas tree on the green construction paper.
  2. Cut this tree and use the original tree as a stencil to cut nine more trees.
  3. Help your child draw a small star on the yellow construction paper.
  4. Cut out ten stars and write numbers 1 through 10 on each star.
  5. Encourage your child to glue a yellow star to the top of each tree. This tree will be your child’s Play-Doh counting mat.
  6. Have your child read the numbers on each tree. Show her how to make a small ball using Play-Doh. Ask her to make the amount of balls that is written on each star and press them on (they should naturally stick). If you want them to permanently stick, you can glue the Play-Doh balls on.
  7. After she has finished pressing on the balls, ask her to count them out loud while touching each ball. Listen carefully and make any necessary corrections.
  8. To hang the trees for decoration, you’ll need to make a small hole punch in the top of each tree. Then cut a string or thin wire and weave it through each tree so that they hang in a long row.

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Here Comes Santa Claus

Here Comes Santa Claus

Help your kid welcome her favorite person of the Christmas season. She’ll cut out rectangles, circles and triangles to create a portrait of the jolliest man of them all: Santa Claus!

What You Need:

  • Paper plate
  • Construction paper (white, red, pink)
  • Scissors
  • Cotton ball
  • Black marker
  • Glue stick

What You Do:

  1. Ask your child to cut out a large circle for Santa’s face using the pink construction paper. Show her the inside circle of the paper plate and ask her to try and make it as large as that area.
  2. Place the white paper horizontally on the table (landscape). Encourage her to cut 10 long strips of white paper about two fingers wide from the bottom to the top of the paper.
  3. Place the red paper on top of the pink circle. Ask her to cut out a large hat for Santa. The base should cover the pink circle and his hat will look like a triangle with a giant “u” at the top.
  4. Have her glue the pink circle to the center of the plate. Then, glue the hat on Santa’s head.
  5. Help her use the glue stick to glue the loops of his beard from the pink circle to the back of the plate.
  6. Encourage her to cut out facial features for Santa. Have her cut out two circles for his eyes, a triangle for his nose and a large “u” smile shape for his lips. Glue them in place.
  7. Have her draw a dot of black in each eye.
  8. Put the finishing touch on Santa by having her glue a cotton ball to the tip of his hat.

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Santa Beard

Santa Beard

Your child can count down the days until Christmas while giving Santa’s beard a trim. This adorable project encourages both counting and number recognition

What You Need:

  • Construction paper (white, pink and red)
  • Markers
  • Glue stick
  • Red and white mini-poms
  • Scissors

What You Do:

  1. Ask your child to cut out a long, white beard for Santa from one sheet of construction paper. It should look like an oblong oval. Kind of like a beaver’s tail!
  2. Encourage her to cut out his face from a sheet of pink construction paper. This will be a short oval which will be placed sideways.
  3. Glue the beard over Santa’s face.
  4. Draw two eyes for Santa.
  5. Cut out his hat from the red construction paper and glue it in place.
  6. Add on his nose and the pom at the tip of his hat.
  7. Ask your child to section out Santa’s beard using lines going horizontal across the beard. Each segment represents one number. She’ll want to draw enough lines to create room for 25 segments.
  8. Starting at the base of the beard, count backwards with your child from 25 to 1.
  9. Encourage her to write the numbers in the segments in that same order. The bottom segment at the bottom of the beard will be “25”, the segment closest to Santa’s chin will be “1”.
  10. Each day ask your child to cut off one segment of Santa’s beard to count down the days until Christmas.

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Stamp a Hand print Candy Cane

Stamp a Hand print Candy Cane

What’s red and white and sweet all over? Candy canes, of course! This tactile painting activity gives kids permission to get messy (just a little bit!) while creating a decorative candy cane mosaic from red and white hand prints. Hang them on the wall as decorations, place them on your Christmas tree, or give them away as personalized keepsakes.

What You Need:

  • Large piece of paper
  • Red and white paint
  • Paintbrush
  • Marker
  • Pencil

What You Do:

  1. Lay the paper on a flat work surface and use the marker to help your child draw a thick outline of a candy cane. The candy cane should be slightly wider than your child’s hand.
  2. With your child, pencil in lines where the stripes will go.
  3. Check to make sure her hands are clean, then help her paint the candy cane with an even coat of white paint.
  4. Starting at the bottom of the outline, help her stamp a hand print to form the first stripe.
  5. Continue stamping white hand prints on alternating stripes, recoating her hand with paint for each hand print.
  6. Help your child wash her hand. Once her hand is thoroughly dry, repeat the process on the alternate stripes using red paint.

When the painted candy cane is completely dry, invite your child to cut out the candy cane and hang it up.

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Santa’s Reindeer

Santa’s Reindeer

Do you hear sleigh bells ringing? It must be the time of year when we get a visit from Santa’s reindeer! Your little one can welcome the reindeer with an adorable reindeer portrait all while learning the difference between small, medium and large. Rudolph, as the star of the portrait, will be the largest. She’ll then choose two of her other favorite reindeer for the medium and small sizes which will serve as a basic introduction to perspective.

What You Need:

  • Construction paper
  • Scissors
  • Glue stick
  • Pencil

What You Do:

  1. Review the names of all of the reindeer s with your child. We have: Dasher, Dancer, Prancer, Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen and, last but not least, Rudolph. See if she can remember their names on her own. Explain that she’ll be featuring Rudolph as the largest reindeer. Then, ask her to choose two other reindeer to feature in the medium and small-sized portraits.
  2. Place a sheet of construction paper in a vertical, or portrait orientation and set it aside to be the background of the reindeer portraits.
  3. Ask her to place a sheet of brown construction paper on the table in a vertical orientation. Have her draw three squares using a pencil. Each square should be larger than the next to create small, medium and large-sized shapes.
  4. On the white paper, have her create circles for the eyes. There will be two large, two medium and two small white circles. Repeat this action with the black paper, but making sure the circles start a bit smaller than before.
  5. Ask her to glue the black circles onto the white circles.
  6. Glue the squares on the paper, overlapping one another. The largest square will be located at the bottom.
  7. Inquire what reindeer she has decided to include in her portrait. Ask her if she remembers all of the reindeer’s’ names.
  8. Have her glue the eyes in place on the squares.
  9. Encourage her to draw and cut out three squares for the reindeer noses. The largest will be red for Rudolph, one will be medium-sized and the other small-sized. Glue them in place.
  10. To complete her reindeer, have her cut out three pairs of antlers, each larger than the next. Glue them in place.

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Make Your Own Ribbon

Make Your Own Ribbon

Make your own ribbon to give gifts and decorations that extra special touch! Personalize your family’s gift wrap with a DIY holiday ribbon this holiday season. Enlist your child’s help to top off the presents with a very special patterned holiday ribbon—crafted with love. Use store bought ribbon (or old scraps from other craft projects) and paints to surprise your family with specialty gift wrap!

This pattern-inspired holiday ribbon project will help him to learn about basic art concepts, develop simple math skills (counting and pattern recognition), and think creatively! Try making several different holiday ribbons to be used for a variety of gifts; recipients will be pleased to see the time that went into wrapping each individual gift!

What You Need:

  • Ribbon in holiday colors (scraps from other activities and projects works well)
  • Non-toxic washable paint in holiday colors
  • Scissors
  • Small (fine) paint brush
  • Small or thin paint sponges (optional)

What You Do:

  1. Help your child cut a piece of ribbon to fit the present being wrapped.
  2. Ask him to stretch the ribbon out and tape it down, to make it easier to work with.
  3. Have your child pick out at least two colors. For an added bonus, try a quick color mixing lesson: Give him the primary colors (blue, red, and yellow) plus white. Encourage him to mix the colors, and create unique shades and hues.
  4. Ask your child to paint a colored pattern on the ribbon. He should start simple with basic lines and shapes. For example, try alternating green and red lines or blue and white circles. As your child progresses, encourage him to create more complex patterns involving multiple colors (more than two), a variety of shapes, and different types of lines. If he is using a painting sponge, he can even incorporate a texture into the design!
  5. Make sure he sets the ribbon aside to dry before wrapping the present with his creation.

This fun holiday project is not just a fun educational art exercise; it also helps your child to create a usable product. Watch as he beams with a sense of accomplishment as his special decorative ribbon is unwrapped. Your family can even hold onto the ribbon creations to use again and again!

 

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Candy Cane Decorations

Candy Cane Decorations

Candy canes are the most popular Christmas candies all around the world. Not only are they tasty, but their shape makes them great to use as decorations on Christmas trees! This season, your child will make his very own candy cane decoration. Though it isn’t edible, it’s a great way for them to learn how to create a repeated pattern using texture. He can make a bunch and put them all around your home!

What You Need:

•    Red construction paper •    Cotton balls •    Glue stick •    Pencil

What You Do:

  1. Ask your child if he can name an object besides a candy cane that has a cane shape. Of course, canes also have the same shape. But, an umbrella would be another great answer.
  2. Ask him if he can draw a large cane shape on the red paper. Help him to make it as large as he can.
  3. Cut out the cane shape.
  4. Encourage him to unroll and tear apart cotton balls to create lines.
  5. Show him how to space lines to create stripes. See if he can create stripes too.
  6. Ask him to place his stripes on the candy cane.
  7. Glue the stripes in place and hang up the candy cane to enjoy during the holiday season!
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Christmas Elves

Christmas Elves

Get in the spirit of Christmas by celebrating Santa’s favorite helpers, the elves! This adorable project will allow your little one to practice distinguishing left from right and up from down using handprint painting. The final product will make a festive addition to any wall.

What You Need:

  • Tempera paint (green and peach)
  • White paper
  • Large paintbrush
  • Markers
  • Googly eyes
  • Glue stick
  • 2 medium poms

What You Do:

  1. Ask your child if they remember which hand is their right hand and which is their left hand. Help them out to remember the difference between the two by having them hold up their left hand and showing them the “L” shape their first finger and thumb make.
  2. Have him show you where the top half of his hand is located (from the base of the fingers up), and where the lower half of his hand is located (from the base of the fingers to the base of his palm).
  3. Help him paint the four fingers of the upper half of his left hand with green paint, and the bottom half of the same hand with peach-colored paint.
  4. Have him stamp his hand on the left side of the paper, gently pressing his hand down to get a good print.
  5. Encourage him to paint his left thumb with the peach-colored paint and have him press it down on the left side of the handprint, near the bottom of the green paint, to create an elf ear. Now let him paint his thumb again and press it on the right side to finish his elf’s ears.
  6. Repeat the entire process for the second elf on the right side of the paper. Let the paint dry completely.
  7. Ask him to outline the elves’ hats in marker and glue a pom on the end of each hat.
  8. Glue some googly eyes in place to help the elves come to life.
  9. Have him draw smiles on the elves to show their Christmas cheer.

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