How to Make a Paper Reindeer

How to Make a Paper Reindeer

Who knew reindeer could come in such fun and functional shapes? Let your child celebrate the season with this recycled craft that turns paper tubes into sweet reindeer ready to be filled with holiday goodies. Your child can give them out as gifts or keep them for himself!

What You Need:

  • Recycled paper tubes
  • Red pom pom
  • 2 brown pipe cleaners
  • Glue
  • Stapler
  • Tissue paper
  • Candy, chocolates and other treats!

What You Do:

  1. Have your child create her reindeer’s nose by gluing a pom pom in the center of the cardboard tube.
  2. Let her glue two wiggle eyes above the pom pom to complete the reindeer’s face.
  3. Next, have her use scissors to cut two pipe cleaners in half.
  4. To make the antlers, help your child staple two pipe cleaners vertically onto the cardboard tube. The pipe cleaner antlers should be at least a finger’s width above the wiggle eyes.
  5. Have your child wrap a short length of pipe cleaner around each stapled antler.
  6. Help her gently stuff a sheet of red tissue paper into the paper roll. This will make a small basket for her treats.
  7. Let her fill the construction tube reindeer with all her yummy chocolates and candies. She’s ready to dig in — or gift her craft to a friend!
 how-to-make-a-paper-reindeer-bigthumb

Make a Festive Holiday Garland

Make a Festive Holiday Garland

It’s time to trim the tree! Get out all your craft collections and see what your child can use to make a festive garland. This activity teaches your child to pattern, which she’ll learn in kindergarten and use in number patterns. Her hands and brain stay busy as she makes creative strands. Your child will love to see her handiwork displayed proudly on the tree!

What You Need:

  • String or ribbon (craft stores sell decorative holiday ribbons, thin sparkly strands)
  • Assortment of things for the garland such as buttons, bells, beads, popcorn, small ornaments
  • Thread
  • Blunt needle
  • Scissors

What You Do:

  1. Cut a long piece of string or ribbon for your garland.
  2. Have your child choose two to three items, and show her how to make an AB (button, bell, button, bell) or ABC (button, bell, bead, button, bell, bead) pattern on the string. Ask her “What comes after the button?” or chant the pattern along with her as she strings. If she wants to use more than two or three items, tell her not to worry! She can make as many different garlands as she’d like.
  3. For a popcorn garland, thread a blunt needle and knot the end. Show her how to carefully poke the needle through the popcorn. You could pattern a popcorn kernel and then a button for an AB pattern.
  4. When she has filled the strand, knot the end, and hang for decoration on your tree or somewhere in your house.

Let her experiment and come up with her own creations. Make several different garlands to hang!

make-a-festive-holiday-garland-slideshowmainimage

Tissue Paper Christmas Tree

Tissue Paper Christmas Tree

‘Tis the season to go crazy over Christmas trees. Engage your child with a Christmas craft that will result in a timeless, brightly-colored tissue paper tree. This project is a great way to spruce up a blank wall during the holiday season, or it can be used on the cover of a Christmas card.

What You Need:

  • Colored Tissue Paper (pre-cut 1″ x 1″ squares)
  • Glue stick
  • Glue (or glitter glue)
  • Glitter
  • Pencil
  • White construction paper
  • Colored construction paper
  • Fabric flower, gift bow, or craft bird

What You Do:

  1. Draw an outline of a Christmas tree on the piece of white construction paper.
  2. Apply the glue stick to a small area of the tree.
  3. Cover the glue with tissue paper squares.
  4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 until the entire tree is covered.
  5. Cut the tree out and glue it to a piece of colored construction paper.
  6. Apply dots of glue on different parts of the tree and cover the dots with glitter. You also might just want to use glitter glue like we did.
  7. After the glue has dried, shake off the excess glitter.
  8. If he wants, have him glue on a tree topper, such as a fabric flower, gift bow or craft bird to finish off his Christmas tree.
 tissue-paper-christmas-tree-slideshowmainimage

Countdown to Christmas

Countdown to Christmas

Get ready to practice counting with your little one with this fun-filled pine forest wonderland! Taking the essence of the basic shape of pine trees, your little one will practice making cones…25 of them to be exact! Along with cone shapes, she’ll also be cutting out circles, one circle to number each tree. Once her pine forest is finished, you can count down the days until Christmas together! Practice counting how many days have passed since the start of December, and how many are left until Santa arrives.

What You Need:

  • Green construction paper
  • Black marker
  • Mini stapler
  • Tape
  • Glue stick
  • Scissors
  • Pencil

What You Do:

  1. Help your child create her first tree by cutting a sheet of construction paper in half, then rolling one half until she has created a cone shape. Cut off the excess paper and staple it in place. Tape over the staples if necessary.
  2. Repeat this step to create 25 cone-shaped trees. Try to vary the sizes to create a visually fun “forest illusion,” which can be enjoyed on any flat surface.
  3. Ask your child to fold a sheet of paper in half as many times as she can.
  4. Trace the base of the glue stick, or anything that is a small circle, on the top sheet of the folded paper.
  5. Cut out the circle from the paper while it’s folded.
  6. Ask her to count how many circles she just made. Have her repeat this process until she has 25 circles total.
  7. Encourage her to number the circles from 1 to 25 using the marker.
  8. Glue one circle on the front of each tree and arrange the trees in ascending numerical order.
  9. Ask her to point to each tree while counting its number out loud.

Variation: To practice subtraction, ask her each day to figure out how many days are left until Santa arrives.

Note: These trees are great for honing sorting skills and mastering number order. They’re also great for visually demonstrating beginning math operations.

 file_645651