Egg Carton Spiders

Egg Carton Spiders

Skeletons, witches, ghosts … It’s that spooky time of year! Get into the Halloween spirit by creating some creepy (but cute) spiders using paper egg cartons, a dab of paint, and a few pipe cleaners. Cutting, painting, and decorating encourage growing creativity and develop fine motor skills. The spiders make adorable wall and table decorations, or a fun craft activity for a party or classroom.

What You Need:

  • Paper egg carton
  • Scissors
  • Pipe cleaners
  • Paint

What You Do:

  1. Help your child cut out one of the sections from the egg carton to form the body of the spider.
  2. Place the cut-out section on your workspace with the outside part facing up. Invite your child to paint it.
  3. When the paint is dry, help her poke four small holes on each side. Insert a 3-4 inch length of pipe cleaner in each one and fold down on the inside to secure.
  4. Bend each pipe cleaner leg in the middle to form spider-like legs.
  5. Encourage her to draw or paint other details on the spider, such as eyes or spots.

For a spooktacular display, make several spiders and arrange them on a “web” of yarn or thinly stretched cotton. Hang the web on a wall or the front door to spook incoming guests and trick-or-treaters.

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Candy Corn Pumpkin

Candy Corn Pumpkin

This Halloween, encourage your child to try her hand at making a super sweet mosaic! She’ll count out and organize candy corn to create a pumpkin shape in this memorable project. Either glue the candy down to create a delightful wall hanging, or simply set it on the table and share the sweetness with friends. Great for preschool.

What You Need:

  • Construction paper (black, green, brown)
  • Lots of candy corn
  • Scissors
  • Glue (optional)

What You Do:

  1. Have your child cut out leaves and a stem for her pumpkin and place them in position on the black construction paper.
  2. Pour the candy out onto the table and have your little learner practice counting. Then, quiz her on her number knowledge by showing her different quantities of candy and challenging her to determine the total number of candies.
  3. Ask your child to “draw” with the candy. She can start with the outline of a pumpkin shape and then fill it in with the rest of the candy corn. Try to keep the candy corn in one layer, without stacking.
  4. If she’d like to keep her mosaic pumpkin as a finished work of art, she should glue down each piece of candy, the stem and the leaves.
  5. However, if she’d rather eat the candy, have her invite some friends over to share her piece of edible pumpkin artwork!

 

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